Archive | March, 2012

The little things of working out

26 Mar

Somedays going to the gym and doing your workout is easy, you’ve got a lot of energy, you’re pumped, ready to go and focused on what you want to achieve. Other days just getting started is the hardest thing. On the days that it is a bit tougher, be honest with yourself and listen to your body and decide whether you should do a “work-out” or what’s called a “work-in.”

A “work-out” expends energy and uses up the body’s resources, while a “work-in” cultivates energy and balances your stresses. If you do decide that yes you’ve eaten enough nutritious food, you’ve drunk enough clean water, you’ve had enough sleep and your body is not under excess stress and that a “work-out” is what you need then a good way to get started is with a proper warmup.

I know for me it takes me about 20-30 minutes to get myself fully warmed up and mentally prepared to get a great workout. I take the time necessary because when lifting heavy weights and pushing your body to the limit, you want to make sure you’re ready, this also helps to prevent injuries and maintains your flexibility.   

Some of the key things that a good warm up should include, is to first of all increase your body temperature so that you get a light sweat going. This can be done by going on the cardio equipment for 5-10 minutes, step ups or light skipping.

My preferred method though is to go through the movements that you’ll be doing in your main workout with light weights or medicine balls. So if your workout is going to include heavy weight training for your whole body, then do some squats and lunges in different directions first, add some arm movements to the lunges to increase the stretch. In between your warm up sets do a few stretches on muscles that you know to be tight. Use the foam roller if necessary then go back to your range of motion exercises. Slowly you increase the temperature and flexibility in your muscles and joints, getting them completely ready for the strenuous exercises to follow.

Another thing that is great, is to get the nervous system awakened aswell. You can do this by squatting or lunging on an unstable surface such as a fitball, bosu, dura discs or on one leg with your eyes closed. Push ups on a bosu or fit-ball works in the same way for the core and upper body.

The process should be gradual, and there really shouldn’t be any rest time needed between the movements and stretching. By following this you’ll be ready for a great workout and depending on your current fitness level, just doing this type of warm up you may find is enough for a workout.

Another key part of working out is what fuel to put in you before and afterwards. For me if I’m going to train in the morning, I might have something like 3 organic boiled eggs, a spoonful of coconut oil and an organic apple when I wake up. This is a light meal that will give me good energy but won’t weigh me down. After my workout I’ll have something more substantial, knowing that what I eat is what I’m going to be making my body out of.

I’m not interested in eating a chicken raised in 36 days from chickling to full size who was drugged up with growth hormones and anti biotics being raised in in-humane conditions and barely able to stand up themselves. That’s not going to be beneficial to my body. That’s one of the reasons I always choose organic food.  

If I’m going to train in the afternoon or evening, I will have a larger organic breakfast which may include some organic meat and organic steamed vegetables. A smaller organic lunch, maybe 2 or 3 fried eggs and an apple then I’ll be ready to train later on. I’ll try to eat 2 to 3 hours before my workout and within 20 mins to an hour after my workout.

Check out the Saturday morning fitness and Wednesday night twilight fitness latest dates in the services section. At both workouts you get to do quality resistance training and total body moves which are excellent for weight loss, toning, and building strength throughout the body and core.

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